Tag Archives: big band orchestration

Finding The Guide Tone Lines: “All The Things You Are”

Now that we’ve picked this tune apart in terms of structure, it’s time to find the actual guide tone lines. Now, granted  we could have done this from the get-go – our analysis of the piece was not completely necessary. … Continue reading

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Part 3: Not Not-Quite-As-Amazing (But Still Useful) Augmented Chord

When we arrive at the “B” section of All The Things You Are, the piece returns to the key of G major, where it started in the verse. Harmonically, this part of the piece consists of nothing more than a … Continue reading

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The Incredible and Amazing Diminished Seventh Chord

I have to give one of my former instructors credit for this one. Dr. Peter Gries, who until his recent retirement was the music department chairman at my old alma mater, spent quite a bit of time on this in … Continue reading

Posted in cadence, central washington university, changes, chord progression, common tone diminished, common tones, diminished chords, guide tone lines, harmonic structures, Improvisation, modulation, music theory, neighbor tones, Orchestration, Shenkerian Analysis | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

A Tale of Two Ditties

Actually, it’s two versions of the same ditty – in this case, the Harry Warren example we’ve been working with so far. You’ll remember the first version in which we simply used the guide tone lines. Here’s what it looks … Continue reading

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Point and Counterpoint – and Being Contrary

Before we attempt to apply counterpoint to the second ending of the “A” section of our example,  I’m going to go through a brief refresher course (or introduction, for you newbies) as to what counterpoint actually is. After all, “counterpoint” … Continue reading

Posted in baroque composers, baroque era, canon, contrary motion, counterpoint, fugue, guide tone lines, harmonic structures, js bach, pachelbel, Shenkerian Analysis | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

Guide Tone Lines In Action, Part 3 – Colors of the Winds

So – what’s wrong with the guide tone line in the second ending in terms of orchestration? Nothing, provided we drop the line an octave. In simplest terms, the second ending of the “A” section in the current example (Harry … Continue reading

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Guide Tone Lines In Action, Part 2

It is said that the only thing two music theorists can agree on is how a third got his analysis wrong. I’ll start out with a disclaimer: this is not  a true Shenkerian analysis of the Harry Warren classic. I … Continue reading

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